SW-3, Brave New World and KWS-1, Brave New World Revisited

The SW-3 and Brave New World were Created in 1931 . . .  and . . .   The KWS-1 and Brave New World Revisited were created in 1958 . . .  Its just a coincidence – that the two radios are of the same era as Huxley’s famous book and his musings on that book almost 20 years later. Brave New World Revisited…

Back to the Future

I have returned my station back to its “pre – 3Y0I” glory. I’m glad the team avoided that nasty giant cyclone, and wish them luck in the future. I’m very much looking forward to getting the Collins KWS-1 back now – I can devote all of my ham hobby time on my new love – “hollow state” and vintage ham gear. Using vintage microphones…

New KY6R QSL

I started my Ham Radio path as a Shortwave Listener – SWL, and that was in 1971 – when I was 11 years old and I built a Heathkit SW-717. It wasn’t a great radio by today’s standards, but to an 11 year old – it was the best. It looked pretty sleek and modern, and heck, I built it! Unfortunately, there are few…

SW-3 Wired Up and Ready to Roll

The amazing National SW-3 – selective, sensitive and with a great signal to noise ratio for a “three tube job” . . . The first “mystery” was which power supply to use – there are three versions of this receiver and each has a different voltage configuration. I purchased what was supposed to work (the “Doghouse”) – and while I got the tubes and…

National SW-3 Lives!

The wonderful 1930’s era National SW-3 was one of the first commercial receivers marketed to the Radio Amateurs. There were three main models – an all DC, all AC and a hybrid of the two. The National SW-3 started advertising in 1931 – and was NEW! in the November QST What is interesting is that up until the late 20’s, hams built their own…

SW-3 Model Two and “60 Series” Coils

This was the last in the SW-3 line. I have a previous model There were several versions of the National SW-3, and they have different power supply and coil (transformer) requirements. At first its a pretty daunting set of configurations to figure out, but luckily, using Google – you can find quite a bunch of great sites. This is one of my favorites: http://www.antiqueradios.org/gazette/SWevol.htm…

SW-3 Project Step 1: Choose and Consolidate

The National SW-3 “All A.C.” Version at KY6R The first thing I had to do is decide which of two SW-3’s I would use for my receiver. The “All A.C.” model won because: It had two of the three coil sets that I wanted – the 40 and 20M band and the upper end of the broadcast band and Top Band (1500 – 2000…

National SW-3: My Latest Project

The 1930’s National “Thrill Box” is an awesome regenerative receiver I am trying to get mine up and running. I actually have two versions – one is the “All AC” model – or ACSW, and the other is the DCSW model – which can be used on AC or DC. Here is a nice page describing both of the units that I have: Rider-1944-MNO-OCR-Page-0191…

The National SW-3

Original SW-3 advertisement The National SW-3 regenerative receiver made its debut in the 1930’s and was designed by James Millen and company. It is a very sensitive receiver that only has three tubes and uses plug in coils for band switching. SW-3 Circuit – so simple I can maintain it and do some restoration if need be There were both battery operated and AC…

A “Tuning” of the Seasons

HRO (National) SW-3 – Circa 1930’s I was lucky to meet Reg – regarding QRP and 1930’s shortwave receivers. This is the SW-3, and here is a video of someone tuning it: https://youtu.be/79GwKtV25dg If you’ve followed my blog – then you know I started out at age 11 in 1970 as a shortwave listener. I built a Heathkit SW-717 receiver and had a blast…